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Caterson Bruce

Caterson Bruce

Cardiff School of Biosciences
Connective Tissue Biology Labs
Cardiff, United Kingdom

Bruce Caterson is currently Professor of Biochemistry in the School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Wales, U.K.. He has degrees from Monash University, Victoria, Australia, (B.Sc. and Ph.D. in Biochemistry, 1971 & 1976, respectively). From 1975-1995 he spent 20 years in academia in the USA; 1975-82, Postdoc – Assistant Professor, UAB, AL; 1982-89, Associate Professor – Professor, West Virginia University; 1989-95, Professor & Endowed Chair in Orthopaedic Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC. In 1995 he moved to Cardiff University, Wales, UK to an Established Chair and from 1998 – 2003 was Head of Connective Tissue Biology in the School of Biosciences and an Executive Manager of the Cardiff Institute of Tissue Engineering & Repair (CITER; 2002-2006). He is currently the Associate Director of Musculoskeletal Research in the School of Medicine. He has served on several USA national research committees (N.I.H. Pathobiochemistry; Arthritis Foundation & Orthopaedic Research and Education Fund), been a member of Editorial Boards (J. Biol. Chem., Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, and Osteoarthritis & Cartilage). He was also the past-President (1993) and Board of Directors member of the USA-based Orthopaedic Research Society (1988-1996). In the UK, he has served on the Wellcome Trust Cell & Molecular Grant Review Panel (2000-2003), been President of the Society for Back Research, Chairman of the British Society for Matrix Biology and President of the British Orthopaedic Research Society. His primary research interests have centred around using monoclonal antibody technologies to study matrix proteoglycan structure, function and metabolism in health and disease with particular emphasis on musculoskeletal tissues. In recent years he has also focussed his research on the glycobiology of the stem/progenitor cell niche. In the past 38 years he has published a total of 184 full papers and 27 chapters and reviews. In 1986 he was awarded the Benedum Distinguished Scholar Award in Biosciences and Medicine from West Virginia University, in 1998 the Kappa Delta Elizabeth Winston Lanier Award for Outstanding Orthopaedic Research from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and Orthopaedic Research Society, in 2009 the Barry Preston Award for his contributions to Australian Matrix Biology & in 2011 the Fell-Muir Award for outstanding contributions to British Matrix Biology.