back top
Shoulder banner sidebar

Cartilage

What is Cartilage?

Cartilage is a tough but flexible tissue that is the main type of connective tissue in the body. Around 65–80% of cartilage is water, although that decreases in older people, and the rest is a gel-like substance called the 'matrix'…

Are all cartilage problems the same?

Joints, such as the knee, are formed of two types of cartilage. The first, articular cartilage, forms a smooth, lubricating layer that prevents wear between the bones. The second type is the meniscus cartilage, tasked with shock absorption, as opposed…

Cartilage Injury and Disease in Children

The ability of body tissues and organs to regenerate after injury depends on their level of specialisation. For example, muscle, bone and skin have good regenerative powers, and can even function well after scarring. However, the cap of cartilage that…

What is Postoperative Rehabilitation?

Rehabilitation is the post-surgical program of re-establishing joint motion, muscle strength around the joint and finally joint function. It is very important to understand that rehabilitation is a long process. While the surgery is performed within hours, the rehabilitation needs…

Joint Resurfacing & Joint Replacement

As a person ages, particularly from 40 years onwards, there is an increasing chance if they have the unfortunate factors of genetics, a period of obesity or high knee stress activity that they will develop pain in the joints that…

Growth Factors

Loss of cartilage usually occurs when the usual balance of building (synthesis) and breaking down (degradation) of tissue that helps to maintain a healthy joint becomes imbalanced. This leads to a steady decline in the quality and quantity of cartilage…

Osteotomy

Osteotomy (literally ‘bone cutting’) is an operation in which a bone is cut to allow the bone to be repositioned; for example, to shorten, lengthen or realign. It may also be used to correct bones that have not healed properly…

Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI)

Damage to joint (articular) cartilage (known as chondral lesions), or damage to both the cartilage and the underlying bone (known as osteochondral lesions), does not repair itself spontaneously and results in joint pain and poor function. Such damage, which is common…

PRP – Plateled Rich Plasma

Blood is a mixture of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and a solution of proteins called ‘plasma’. PRP, or ‘platelet-rich plasma’, is a concentrated solution of platelets taken from ‘autologous’ blood; in other words, from your own blood…

Physiotherapy & Braces

Depending on where a patient is on the spectrum of cartilage injury, or how far ‘down the curve’ they are, conservative management such as physiotherapy or braces may be an option. As it is non-invasive, it may be suitable for…

Diagnosis and Treatment of Hip Disorders

Cartilage injuries of the hip typically involve damage to the acetabulum (hip socket) or the femoral head (ball) of the hip joint. However, by far the most common injuries occur on the side of the acetabulum.